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Thread: Managing 56 acres for Whitetails

  1. #11
    Four Pointer Acorn1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lasttombstone View Post
    I will throw a couple of things out to you that I have found through experience. #1..... create some bedding area of your own. This will do as much as anything to keep deer on your property. Find the biggest concentration of Virginia pine and get rid of them. Just let the area grow back. I have started too late but maybe someone will benefit from what I am doing. Just slow go at old age with a chainsaw and a small tractor. Virginia pine isn't good for much of anything. Cut it down, saw it up and use it around your farm. Oh, yeah, #2 would be to get rid of the Virginia pine. I have no idea what farm land is leasing for these days. I have 17 ac. of open ground on my place and just gave it to a local farmer to plant. He usually plants corn followed by wheat. If I want corn for the deer, I just go pick it up. If I have needs that require something heavier than my little tractor he will usually take care of it when he is in the area. Just be sure to keep who ever you let farm the place a good distance away from the edges of the woods. Edge is one of the most important factors for rabbits, quail and little turkeys. I feel I get a lot more benefit from the association with my farmer than I would benefit from the money someone may pay for the land use. Good luck with your adventure.
    Thanks, actually I had the same idea as you. Although I said lease I will let someone plant the land in exchange for them leaving me some standing crop.
    So tell me what you really think about Virginia Pine! LOL! That is good advise and I think the VP will be on my hit list.


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  2. #12
    Four Pointer Acorn1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lbksmom View Post
    Another very important factor to holding deer is water. Do you have a creek running thru it ?? If not create you a water hole in the lowest part, between power line and AG field. I put out the bio rock and minerals Feb.- Aug. Soy beans in summer and fall Durano/Ladino clover section and oats and winter greens next to it. Lime it good, keep that PH 6.5 up for best growing along with fertilizer. Turkey love clover too. I would put a couple stand sites on the eastern side that is off limits, 1st Sep. put some corn bait and camera and see what you got? and tag 8 point up. If you do take a doe take on west side. Your power line will give you some fast action in November during the chase/rut phase. Keep food plots, bait sites at least 50 yards away property boundries. Good luck, looks very promising.
    There was a small spring in the stand of trees within the field. I just dug it out and made a30'x30' pond. It's about 70% full and was dug last week.
    Thanks for the advice! I'm very excited by this project but get overwhelmed fast! Not sure where to start...lol. I do have about 1/2-3/4 acre of kudzu that I have been dealing with the last few weeks. Trying to pull as much as I can and bush hog the rest. Will spray it in the spring.
    Regarding minerals should I mix my own or just buy the premixed blends and bio rocks? I use to mix them in PA but ended up with more then I could use in a year. Not sure if they keep or not.


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  3. #13
    Four Pointer Acorn1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by remingtonman View Post
    Don't forget to manage for cover. This is a critical piece of the equation for bedding, security and fawning cover. Switchgrass and early successional habitat fill the bill
    It's funny you say that about cover. If I don't find a farmer to plant my fields this spring I was going to leave this grass for just that purpose. It's about 4-5 acres worth.


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  4. #14
    Four Pointer Acorn1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sky hawk View Post
    There is a lot of info out there. Some conflicting as you say. Some ideas work in certain areas of the country but not in others. Some plots are better in certain areas than others.

    There are no truly right or wrong answers. The fun part about this is you can/will experiment, and will continue to change things up for the next 20 years. The most forethought needs to go into the long term initiatives like tree planting/harvesting. Food plots can be changed/rotated from year to year, and you can experiment as much or as little as you like. And everyone you talk to will have a different opinion. Just have fun with it and don't worry about what is absolutely the "BEST".
    Your right! I just need to put a game plan together and stick with it! It's going to be a busy 2017! Thanks for the input!


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  5. #15
    Four Pointer Acorn1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Revo View Post
    Once you remove the trees that aren't beneficial to give the mast trees the needed sunlight the soft mast will fill in. Native plants are always best since they have already been proven in the area. A few bags of fertilizer and a honeysuckle patch becomes a goldmine for bedding and browse, as does a patch of greenbriar.
    Good idea! Actually everyone has good ideas! If I was only 30 years old again! This 60 year old retired guy will give it my best effort! Going to have to move my son out of Mooresville and up to the foothills to help me out!


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  6. #16
    Twelve Pointer josh's Avatar
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    How old is the loblolly plantation/what did your forester recommend for that stand? That will be a nice bedding area when/if you decide to have them harvested. Looks like a cool piece of property with a lot of potential.

    If it was me I 'd have the loblolly clearcut as soon as they are merchantable and let it naturally regenerate.
    The last time I walked through the swamp, I stood up on a cypress stump, I listened close and I heard the ghost of Osceola cry

  7. #17
    Four Pointer Acorn1956's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by josh View Post
    How old is the loblolly plantation/what did your forester recommend for that stand? That will be a nice bedding area when/if you decide to have them harvested. Looks like a cool piece of property with a lot of potential.

    If it was me I 'd have the loblolly clearcut as soon as they are merchantable and let it naturally regenerate.
    The stand description says, "the average diameter distribution ranges from 4-8" and the dominant tree heights range from 35'-40'. Product wise the current stand is considered to be pulpwood. Cored trees indicate the stand to be 24 years of age.
    The well distributed stand is adequately stocked and has a high proportion of smaller natural Virginia pine stems in the understory. The stand is of good quality and no insects or disease was found. In addition to the natural pines, the understory consists of American holly, mountain laurel, switch cane and is dense with greenbrier."

    Management Recommendations:
    The trees in Area 2 are currently growing well and do not need any management at this time. Please contact us in 5 years for re-examination of this area.


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