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Thread: Turkey cleaning

  1. #11
    Administrator Tipmoose's Avatar
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    Making this a sticky for awhile.

  2. #12
    Eight Pointer
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    its just bits and peices i pick up and save from the net that i know people will get good use from. Heck i even ask the person who created it if i can steal it to post elsewhere most of the time

  3. #13
    Twelve Pointer blackheel's Avatar
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    I would like to add that you can get meat from the wing and back that grinds well. I typically grind the leg, thigh, wing, and back meat all together for tacos, chili, etc.

  4. #14
    Old Mossy Horns GrizzlyBear's Avatar
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    Gut the bird then cool it down to 40 or cooler. Let is set for 24-48 hours until rigor mortis is gone otherwise it will be tough.
    "Standards are meant to be lowered" - Levi, May 29, 2012

  5. #15
    SwampCat
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    Dobber, I'm new to the forum and have been going through some of the older threads. Great one from you on how to de-bone a turkey.

  6. #16
    Twelve Pointer bshobbs's Avatar
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    10-4 great pics and guide.

    I do mine pretty much the same but once I have the legs, breast I venture inside and grab the heart, liver and gizzard. Grab the gizzard and cut around. Dump out the rocks and food particles and pull the dull yellow lining from inside the gizzard off.

    Now the legs, neck, gizzard, heart and liver are ready for the crock pot. Little salt, pepper and some of your favorite fresh herbs and let it sit for 8 hours. Fit for a king. Add a nice pot of rice and hot biscuits.

    <*)))))>{

  7. #17
    Deersynyr
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    Great walk through and advice, its people like this that make this such an amazing sport, and why this is such an amazing forum.

  8. #18
    Twelve Pointer 7mm-08's Avatar
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    The turkeys beard is more like a feather than a beard. You can firmly grasp the beard and pull it strait out. The base will pop out of the skin like a feather. It will be hard on the end similar to a quill on a feather, no need for salt or borax. Just trim the hull away about 1\4 inch above the brass on your shotgun shell, leaving a small ring of color just before the brass starts, and take a nail and remove the SPENT pirmer. Take about eight inches of a rawhide shoe lace and insert the ends into the primer hole from the back. Fill the brass almost half way up with epoxy and insert the beard. Hold strait until glue sets.

  9. #19
    dumbbuck
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    very helpful thank you

  10. #20
    reddrum
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    I had always been eager to try and pluck a bird to roast or fry whole. My attempts over the past 5 years were quickly thorted by extremely difficult to pluck gobblers. I'd pluck a few feathers, tear some skin, and give up. Last year I set out to take a jake (after I shot my tom of course!) to see if plucking a younger bird would be any easier. After killing him I aged him in a cooler for 24 hrs. I did this more out of necessity b/c I had to get to work that morning. Hanging game birds to 'age' is a common practice...google it if you're curious. I'm not convinced the 'aging' helped with the plucking, but when I set to pluck that jake it was pretty damn easy! After cleaning him up I wrapped up the 'giblets' and stuffed them inside his gut cavity, then wrapped him in freezer paper, and froze to be eaten later. 4 months later that day came. I thawed him out, and placed the whole bird in a brine solution for 24 hrs. This makes sure the meat is seasoned well, and stays moist. Baked him for a get together with friends the next day, and I must say, the entire bird, along with the giblet gravy, was outstanding. Give it a try if you happen to luck into a jake this year!



    Last edited by reddrum; 03-17-2010 at 09:10 AM.

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