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Thread: Coyotes Are there really that many of them?

  1. #151
    Old Mossy Horns
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    ^ I can agree. I'm sure it happens and when money is to be made, there are those that will be willing to chance it for profit. Coyotes were on the increase in NC and I'm sure some made it here in not so natural ways. However, coyotes were naturally expanding at the same time and I have heard a biologist state that coyotes would likely be here in the numbers they are today, fox pens or not. That leads to another note, coyotes are now dime a dozen in many places. The price for a live coyote has been cut nearly in half from $150 to $75 or less, with this drop in price illegal importation is less profitable and less attractive to those unscrupulous people that like to make a quick dollar.
    "One does not hunt in order to kill, one kills in order to have hunted". Finn Aagard

  2. #152
    Old Mossy Horns Ldsoldier's Avatar
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    I agree, though I believe they would just be making it to the eastern part of the state.
    GO WOLFPACK!

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ldsoldier View Post
    I agree, though I believe they would just be making it to the eastern part of the state.
    ^^ This may be right. No argument.

    Nobody predicted the coyote's movement into NC from the south. WAY, WAY, WAY back in NC STATE'S history, Dr Fred Barkalow stated that coyote's movement into NC would come from the north via Virginia and/or Tennessee across the NC mountains.

    Nobody had a clue that they would (somehow) get across the Mississippi and absolutely explode in the SE US. The jump into NC DID come across as a quantum leap.

  4. #154
    Twelve Pointer darkthirty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winnie 70 View Post
    How is this leading to more coyotes...they get out of pins, eventually turned loose, until "live market shut, there going to be ...load in this state"....explain? You lost me here...and may be dumb question.
    I'm just saying, trapping and moving them accomplishes nothing. Yeah, you get rid of them in one area, but your moving them to another.
    They will get out of a fox pen. The nature of what it is dictates that. I'm not saying all of them, but some will get out.
    I say that as someone who has friends who trap and sell live. They are extremely good trappers. Can't blame them when even at $75/coyote, that's still ~$50 more than what the fur is worth on a eastern dog. Not knocking fox pens either. Been there done that and love a good race. Just stating how it is.
    Last edited by darkthirty; 01-11-2017 at 09:28 PM.

  5. #155
    Six Pointer Dolfan21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkthirty View Post
    I'm just saying, trapping and moving them accomplishes nothing. Yeah, you get rid of them in one area, but your moving them to another.
    They will get out of a fox pen. The nature of what it is dictates that. I'm not saying all of them, but some will get out.
    I say that as someone who has friends who trap and sell live. They are extremely good trappers. Can't blame them when even at $75/coyote, that's still ~$50 more than what the fur is worth on a eastern dog. Not knocking fox pens either. Been there done that and love a good race. Just stating how it is.
    http://www.fieldandstream.com/predat...efault&src=syn

    Here is an article that was just released that is somewhat related to your trapping comment darkthirty, even if you are trapping and killing and not must trapping and relocating. Seems a recent theory is that the timing of the trapping makes all the difference. To summarize the article, there are 2 main types of coyotes, transient and resident. If you kill a resident, the studies are showing that it only takes a few weeks for a transient yote to take the place of the resident...so if you are trapping in the winter, as most do, by the time the fawns are born there will be a new yote in the area, negating the effects of any winter trapping efforts. Just passing the info along, in case any found it interesting. I am new to this topic so this may be common knowledge to y'all. My bad if that is the case.
    Last edited by Dolfan21; 01-12-2017 at 04:03 PM.
    A poor craftsman blames his tools.

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolfan21 View Post
    http://www.fieldandstream.com/predat...efault&src=syn

    Here is an article that was just released that is somewhat related to your trapping comment darkthirty, even if you are trapping and killing and not must trapping and relocating. Seems a recent theory is that the timing of the trapping makes all the difference. To summarize the article, there are 2 main types of coyotes, transient and resident. If you kill a resident, the studies are showing that it only takes a few weeks for a transient yote to take the place of the resident...so if you are trapping in the winter, as most do, by the time the fawns are born there will be a new yote in the area, negating the effects of any winter trapping efforts. Just passing the info along, in case any found it interesting. I am new to this topic so this may be common knowledge to y'all. My bad if that is the case.
    that is a great article Dolfan21 and touches on an area i have not heard or plain missed, that the timing of the trapping could help with fawn mortality.

    otherwise the article confirms a lot of folks fears, they are invincible.

  7. #157

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    There was also a study done by a college that stated if 70% of the population was killed the following year would yield a higher population than the previous year that just proves they have the ability to evolve

  8. #158
    Old Mossy Horns Greg's Avatar
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    Some of the stuff we've been talking about .... southeast hit harder than other places, doe kill, habitat, fawn kill, timing of trapping ...

    https://www.americanhunter.org/artic...-populations/#
    Last edited by Greg; 01-18-2017 at 10:15 AM.

  9. #159
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    ^ I don't buy on the pine plantation part. Regenerating clear cuts and thinned pines are some of the thickest places I have ever tried to walk. Lots of the areas I hunt are for pine production and most are rotated. The woods east of I-95 can be a challenge to navigate in a lot of areas, regardless of the age of the trees.
    "One does not hunt in order to kill, one kills in order to have hunted". Finn Aagard

  10. #160
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    Good summary article, Greg

    This "habitat crutch" has been used since the Savannah River work was completed (2012?) and is frequently mentioned in reference to the Ft Bragg work.

    In an ideal world, a coyote would have eaten a woodpecker................................

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