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Thread: Coyotes Are there really that many of them?

  1. #141
    Old Mossy Horns
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ncgundogs View Post
    Coyotes are tough to kill and it is equally tough to control there population last year I killed 67 coyotes and there are still plenty of coyotes on the same 1000 acre farm there would need to be a bunch more trappers and a bunch more hunters to even start to control the population

    Killing that many by calling is astounding. Just read that was your method.

    Congratulations.

  2. #142
    Old Mossy Horns Greg's Avatar
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    Did a little scouting out back today. Some deer tracks ... some small dog / coyote tracks (not fresh, hard to tell).
    Dying isn't so bad. The real tragedy is that most people never really live.
    Proverbs 26:4
    Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid.

  3. #143

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    Thanks oldest school I have been calling for many years and I'm not always successful I strikeout a bunch but that's what keeps me coming back and darkthirty makes a good point the whole reason behind predator control is not to kill a population they have studiesthat show that's pretty much impossible the role of predator control is to control predation and it takes quite a few kills to do that and manner of take really means nothing trapping is more effective but also more time consuming I hunt to perfect my calling

  4. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkthirty View Post
    If anyone thinks your going to affect the coyote populations by "hunting" them. Your wrong. Personally, I've hunted in areas that had extremely high coyote populations but also has high deer and turkey densities. Been like that for years upon years. I guess I'm kinda in-different on it. I'll shoot'em if I see'em but not because I think I'm doing anything beneficial. Just another legal opportunity to pull the trigger.
    If you want to hurt the population. Get a good trapper. Not a newbie, not a weekend warrior. I mean a d@mn good trapper. And stay on'em year round. Anyone else and all your gonna do more than likely is educate about 1/3 to 1/2 of the coyotes. You can really work on the populations like that. If serious management and control is your goal, I think your wasting your time shooting them. Yeah, it's fun, but your not really accomplishing anything.
    While we're at it. I'm all for every manner of trapping and supporting hobbies and making money. But until the live market on coyotes is shut down, there's always going to be a $h!tload of coyotes in this state.
    Darkthirty, what do you mean "live market on coyotes"....selling them to be placed in a pin and run with dogs...like running fox? Hope didn't ask a stupid question.

  5. #145
    Old Mossy Horns Ldsoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winnie 70 View Post
    Darkthirty, what do you mean "live market on coyotes"....selling them to be placed in a pin and run with dogs...like running fox? Hope didn't ask a stupid question.
    Yes, he's referring to fox pens.
    GO WOLFPACK!

  6. #146
    Old Mossy Horns Greg's Avatar
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    The best thing to help a prey species survive is to improve the habitat to give them not only food, but escape and cover and concealment options.

    Another way to help fawn survivability is to get the buck:doe ratio fairly even so most fawns are born at roughly the same time. The theory says you then get a short period of "prey saturation", sacrificing a few for the good of the many, rather than trickling the fawns out only to have them mostly all killed a few days apart over time. Of course, if the predators are taking down adults, that might not matter much.
    Dying isn't so bad. The real tragedy is that most people never really live.
    Proverbs 26:4
    Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid.

  7. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ldsoldier View Post
    Yes, he's referring to fox pens.
    How is this leading to more coyotes...they get out of pins, eventually turned loose, until "live market shut, there going to be ...load in this state"....explain? You lost me here...and may be dumb question.

  8. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg View Post
    The best thing to help a prey species survive is to improve the habitat to give them not only food, but escape and cover and concealment options.

    Another way to help fawn survivability is to get the buck:doe ratio fairly even so most fawns are born at roughly the same time. The theory says you then get a short period of "prey saturation", sacrificing a few for the good of the many, rather than trickling the fawns out only to have them mostly all killed a few days apart over time. Of course, if the predators are taking down adults, that might not matter much.
    I have read research where it is suggested that neither habitat or a length of the fawning period made any significant difference on fawn survival were predation by coyotes was concerned. I have also read that some people believe that the eastern coyote (coy-wolf) has/is adapting to be a "specialist" as a deer predator.
    "One does not hunt in order to kill, one kills in order to have hunted". Finn Aagard

  9. #149
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    Fox pens: In a legal operation only coyotes and foxes legally trapped in NC can be bought by licensed fox pen operators. This equals no net gain of coyotes in NC. Most pen owners work hard at keeping coyotes in the pen, it is not advantageous to spend money and not try and secure your investment. Plus, coyotes are feed in these pens and coyotes have food source readily available. There is no need for them to escape and most don't. Heck, I have even seen a fair amount of rabbits and deer in training pens with coyotes and foxes, so I'm positive the coyotes are not hungry. Actually, I have seen a deer run coyotes off a feeder in a pen.

    Importing coyotes across state lines is a violation of the Lacey Act.
    "One does not hunt in order to kill, one kills in order to have hunted". Finn Aagard

  10. #150
    Old Mossy Horns Ldsoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS View Post
    Fox pens: In a legal operation only coyotes and foxes legally trapped in NC can be bought by licensed fox pen operators. This equals no net gain of coyotes in NC. Most pen owners work hard at keeping coyotes in the pen, it is not advantageous to spend money and not try and secure your investment. Plus, coyotes are feed in these pens and coyotes have food source readily available. There is no need for them to escape and most don't. Heck, I have even seen a fair amount of rabbits and deer in training pens with coyotes and foxes, so I'm positive the coyotes are not hungry. Actually, I have seen a deer run coyotes off a feeder in a pen.

    Importing coyotes across state lines is a violation of the Lacey Act.
    In theory you're absolutely correct. I don't believe pen owners intentionally let game out. That said I've caught bobtailed foxes before. If a fox can get out so can a coyote. I don't believe it happens often, but it does happen. Importing across state lines is a violation of the Lacey Act. It was also illegal to have coyotes in fox pens during the 90's. Being illegal doesn't always stop people. I do know some individuals have turned coyotes out in the eastern part of the state on public land for the express purpose of running them with their dogs. Call it what it is.
    GO WOLFPACK!

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