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Thread: Clover help

  1. #1

    Default Clover help

    So I originally planted this clover plot 9/15. It came up great, but now I fear that the native plants are trying to take it back. I think I need to get ahead of it and try some weed control. I was also thinking of frost seeding it in February. Any thoughts on what to use for weed control and when? This plot is in a deep bottom and it's probably 1/4 acre.



    IMG_1665.jpgIMG_2329.jpgIMG_2330.jpgIMG_2331.jpg


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  2. #2
    Old Mossy Horns sky hawk's Avatar
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    Clover will go dormant in the winter, then jump back in the spring when it begins to warm. It often looks pretty poor this time of year, but if it was established well, it will look pretty good by the end of April. If it came up great (full), then you shouldn't need to frost seed.

    You can use a grass-selective herbicide (clethodim or sethoxydim) anytime the grasses are actively growing, not now. Is that fescue? It looks like you didn't get a good kill before you planted. Usually if you spray well before you plant, there won't be mature clumps of grasses this time of year.

  3. #3
    Twelve Pointer 25contender's Avatar
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    Keep it mowed and spray for grass. I mow mine 3-4 times a year. The first mowing is in the spring after it flowers and the flowers die. Then I mow as needed.

    This 4 acre clover field has only been planted for 1 year and is eaten down to 1/2 inch in height.

    I will putting some lime down as soon as it drys out a bit.


    Here is what ours looked like as of last week. The deer are just tearing it up right now. I have tons of deer pics off this field.





    Last edited by 25contender; 01-11-2017 at 11:58 AM.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for your input guys. I've sprayed roundup on it twice and 2-4-IMG_0470.jpgIMG_0474.jpgd on it 6 months prior to planting. This plot was old hardwoods that was never planted before I did it. I have no clue what that grass is, but it's coming up in huge clumps and seems to be choking out the clover. I also need to figure out how to kill the old stumps, way too much growth on them that I'm having to cut back. I've never mowed because it's hard to get a cutter down to it, but I can use a weed wacker to cut it. Will definitely spray in the spring when that grass starts to grow. Here is a picture of it last year in the first year it was planted.


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  5. #5
    Old Mossy Horns Eric Revo's Avatar
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    depending on the type of grass or sedge that's growing in clumps, you may need to check your PH.....broom sage and some other clumping grasses are easily managed by getting your ground a bit sweeter. It's good for the clover too.
    If you're in a silt or sand based soil your initial application of lime may have leached a bit. Most hardwoods have a very acidic soil anyway to start with.
    Last edited by Eric Revo; 01-11-2017 at 01:31 PM.

  6. #6
    Ten Pointer
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    Most likely need a lot more lime added to it based on where it was planted. As far as the stumps you can cut back and then pain on glyphosphate and it should take care of stumps.

  7. #7
    Old Mossy Horns jug's Avatar
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    Yeah you may need more lime and frost seeding some more clover. Looks like you are getting some overbrowsing but never hurts to add lime. Spray with sethoxydim in May or June for any grassy weeds. I have to frost seed 25 pounds of ladino clover every year on my little farm in Rockingham county because of the overbrowsing . We put out 2800 pounds of lime over 4+ acres of pasture this week. Takes about 3 months for the lime to start working in the soil up there , by that time the clover will be growing again .
    You may need to do some soil tests. Never hurts
    Last edited by jug; 01-14-2017 at 09:01 PM.
    Hunting in the Sandhills and Foothills of NC

  8. #8
    Eight Pointer Boojum's Avatar
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    Those clumping sedges are usually a sign of permanent moisture. They normally grow in bogs and marshes that get some sunlight. Providing more drainage might be the best way to get rid of it.
    Last edited by Boojum; 01-16-2017 at 09:07 AM.

  9. #9

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    Good advice guys. There is definitely a lot of moisture as it is surrounded on three sides by a small creek. It will flood periodically, but usually will recede fairly quickly. All of this growth is after hurricane Matthew. Think it is worth spraying, or will it grow too quickly?


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  10. #10
    Old Mossy Horns jug's Avatar
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    Don't spray till May. Clover will not tolerate flooding
    Hunting in the Sandhills and Foothills of NC

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